Sleep and Mental Health

Notorious for not Getting Enough Sleep

I am notorious for not getting enough sleep. In high school, I’d sleep at two in the morning finishing a term paper I procrastinated on and in college, I’d pull all-nighters. I lacked rest because I delayed on academics and I’d be off hanging out with friends. Sleep to me was something that was unneeded, and I thought I was invincible. In hindsight, I realized not getting enough Zzzzzz’s affected my mental health.

Sleep Affecting my Mental Health

My lack of sleep affected my mental health in many ways. One, it made focusing in school tough. I fell asleep in class and missed out on valuable information. Besides, not sleeping enough increased my anxiety and made it difficult to focus. Second, my lack of sleep affected my friendships. I’d be forgetful of important events, and my friends would be irritated. Also, my sleepiness made me prone to irritation, which made me unlikable.

Taking Sleep Seriously

It wasn’t really until recently; I started taking sleep seriously. It helps that Mr. Squigglekins has school early in the morning, which encourages me to sleep before twelve in the morning. I’ve seen positive results from at least achieving seven or more hours of sleep.

Here are the results:

1. I don’t need any stimulant, such as coffee or tea, to keep me awake. Usually, I don’t experience caffeine crashes, but when I do, they can be terrible.

2. My mood is better, and I’m able to cope productively with the daily stress of living.

3. I am energetic, and I don’t feel sluggish. Going to work doesn’t feel like a marathon, and I don’t think of napping as much.

4. My focus has improved, and I don’t feel my attention waving from what’s important.

5. I CAN CONQUER THE DAY!

I admit that I still struggle with getting enough sleep, especially when watching an engaging show or out on an adventure with Mr. Squigglekins, but at least I know my sleeping patterns are in a better place than they were in the past.

Photo By Eugene0126jp (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons